Latest banking security threats

See the latest threats targeting your personal and business information.

What do scams look like?

Scams can take a number of forms, but here are the most common ones.

Cold calls

This is when scammers call you and pose as either us or a different company to try and get personal details from you.

Emails

These involve scammers sending you fake emails to try and get you to follow a link, which prompts you to enter personal details.

SMS'

These involve scammers sending a fake SMS with a link to a form or website that’s used to try and steal your details.

Celebrity bitcoin scam

This one involves either an email or a celebrity endorsed Facebook ad that encourages you to buy bitcoin. The email or ad will try to get you to click on a link and enter your bank details.
 

Fake NBN call

An example of a cold call scam, this one involves receiving a call from scammers claiming to be fixing your NBN. They then attempt to get remote access to your computer or internet connection where they can transfer funds from your account.
 

Fake Microsoft pop-up

For this one, scammers create a pop-up on your screen that claims your computer has a fatal virus. It prompts you to call a number which gives scammers remote access to your account.
 

Fake ATO call

This is a very common one currently where scammers call you claiming to be from the ATO. They may request you to provide personal details to be verified, notify you of an outstanding debt, or request bank account details for payments or refunds. They may also threaten you with prison if you don’t provide details.

If you’ve received a call like this, don’t follow their instructions and hang up straight away. You can also report it directly through the ATO website.
 

Mail delivery scams

This scam tries to get access to your card details by claiming to be from postal delivery services, both via email and SMS. The email, which you can see an example of, prompts you to pay for shipping costs for a parcel delivery and gives you a link to a fake website which tries to get you to enter your card and personal details. Remember, phishing websites are designed to look like ours, but have a different URL (we’ll never send you a link using https://bit.ly).

The SMS version of this scam claims that a parcel has been kept at a sorting office for you. It also contains a link to a fake website to try and prompt you to pay a fee to release the parcel. If you receive either of these messages, don’t click on the link or respond.

Coronavirus-related scams

We’re currently seeing many instances of scammers impersonating business and government authorities using COVID-19 messages. We’ve also seen a number of coronavirus-related online shopping scams.

A few specific examples to watch out for are:

Flight refund scam

Scammers are targeting people who are waiting for refunds from airlines that cancelled flights due to the coronavirus shutdown. They're doing this a couple of ways:

  • Creating fake airline websites (such as Qantas and Virgin) where customers are prompted to call a fake number and tricked into giving card details and an SMS code so a refund can be issued
  • Sending messages to customers with a fake flight refund form and telling them to fill it in with their name and credit card details.


Using these tricks, cybercriminals could collect personal and financial information and use them to carry out a broad range of malicious activities. Data gathered could also be offered for sale on the dark web.

To confirm the source of emails or messages you receive, and to verify that you're not getting contact details from fake websites, directly contact the company using a phone number from the White Pages online directory.

Texts from ‘GOV’ or ‘MyGov’

There have been multiple reports of texts that appear to come from ‘GOV’ or ‘MyGov’, with suspicious links to more information related to COVID-19.

For more information about coronavirus related scams, visit the Stay Smart Online and Scamwatch websites.

Common threats

Phishing emails

Scammers commonly send emails to customers posing as Bankwest. This email asks you to follow a link and then enter your card details, or log in to online banking. Remember – we’ll never ask you for personal details via email, or give you a direct link to online banking.
 

Cold calls

This is where scammers call customers and pose as us to request card details. If you receive a call like this, make sure you don’t give out any details and hang up straight away.
 

Amazon scam

This one involves an email or phone call from scammers pretending to be from Amazon. Scammers claim that you’re due for a refund and prompt you to give your card details. If you receive an email or call like this, make sure you don’t reply or provide any card details. It might also be a good idea to reach out to Amazon directly to let them know.

If you’ve followed any of these links or think a scammer has your details, make sure you get in touch.
 

Fake Bankwest fraud investigation call

Scam callers can pretend to be a part of our fraud department, asking you to help with an internal investigation.

They ask you to confirm the amount of money in your account and to withdraw cash to deposit at another bank. The scammer also asks you not to speak to anyone, so you don’t tip off the employee being investigated.

If you’ve received a call like this, don’t provide any of your details or do as they ask. If you already have, call us on 13 17 19. Remember, we’ll never ask a customer to participate in an internal investigation or transfer money to another financial institution on our behalf.
 

Fake Bankwest email and form

This email comes from an unauthorised part posing as us with the subject line ‘Bankwest Suspension Notification’ (we’ve included an example). Once opened, it asks you to fill out an attached form which provides the fraudster with your details.

If you’ve received an email like this, don’t open the attachment or provide any of your details. If you already have, call us on 13 17 19.

Fake Bankwest emails

These emails come from scammers posing as us, attempting to lure you into providing your bank details by clicking on specific links.

One email asks you to visit a link to avoid having your card suspended. The other asks you to log in to online banking to see a new ‘SecureMail’ message.

If you’ve received emails like these, don’t click the links or provide any of your details. If you already have, call us on 13 17 19.
 

Past threats

Free giveaway scams

This scam involves an iPhone giveaway across Facebook, Instagram, Google and YouTube. You’ll see a pop-up on your screen promising you a free iPhone for a small delivery fee, which then links to a fake website that prompts you to enter your card and personal details. Alternatively, you might be asked to complete a survey to receive the iPhone. Make sure you ignore these pop-ups.
 

Blocked card phishing email

This email comes from scammers posing as us, attempting to get your personal details. They claim that your Bankwest card is blocked and ask you to click on a link to unblock it.

The link takes you a fake version of online banking, which takes your details after you log in. It then shows a form asking for some personal and account info. See examples of the initial email and fake form below.
 

Fake SMS and Bankwest Online Banking login page

This SMS comes from scammers posing as us, trying to get you to click a link. This link sends you to a fake online banking login page which asks for your Personal Access Number (PAN) and secure code. You’re then directed to a fake ‘Verification’ page which asks for further details like your date of birth and mobile number. After these details are entered, the fake website redirects to our real website to try and make their request look legitimate. See an example below.

If you’ve received an SMS like this, don’t follow the link or try to respond. If you already have, call us on 13 17 19.

Fake Bankwest verification SMS

This involves scammers posing as us, trying to get you to click a link and provide your bank details. If you’ve received an SMS like this, don’t follow the link or try to respond. If you already have, call us on 13 17 19.
 

What to look out for

Scams often have common characteristics that will help you spot them.

Direct links to online banking

We won’t ever do this.

Unfamiliar screens

Especially if they ask for bank details and personal info.

Use of a generic greeting

We’ll always address you by name.

Anyone claiming to be us

If you’re unsure, you can call us back on 13 17 19.

Suspicious email addresses

Or a file attachment that doesn’t look right.

Email requests for more info

Like your name, date of birth or phone number.

 Something not quite right?

Get in touch with us so we can look into it for you.

See something suspicious?

Call us immediately if you’re worried about possible fraud.

Is someone pretending to be us?

If you’re not sure about an email or SMS, don’t click any links or attachments.